THERAPY INFORMATION

Looking into outside help?
We have compiled some therapy FAQs and other info.

 

THERAPY FAQS

WHY SHOULD YOU SEEK OUT THERAPY?

While most people recover from emotional hardship given time, those undergoing therapy are more likely to improve, faster to improve, and develop less relapse than those not in therapy.

HOW DO YOU PAY FOR THERAPY?

Most insurances will cover the costs of therapy. A lot of therapy places will charge your family, and then your insurance will reimburse your family for what they cover. The amount your insurance company reimburses will vary according to the plan you have.

WHAT INSURANCE DO YOU NEED FOR THERAPY?

Many health insurance plans do cover therapy, and treat it as any other medical incident. Your parents should know what your health plan covers, and be able to find the therapist that works well for sure, and is covered by insurance.

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT THERAPY SESSIONS YOU CAN CHOOSE FROM?

Most teen therapy centers will have you choose from one-on-one, group, or family therapy. One-on-one therapy is when you meet your therapist, and they are solely focused on you. Group therapy is when you are in a group of five or more teens that deal with similar problems as yourself and are also within your age range; group therapy is less personal and specific to your needs. Family therapy is when your therapist helps you and your family members resolve issues together. You should choose the therapy choice that will help you overcome your distress in the best possible way.

HOW OFTEN DO YOU NEED TO GO TO THERAPY?

Teens tend to visit their therapists once a week, but if they feel that they are improving mentally, they can change to visiting once every two weeks or once a month. The frequency of when one visits their therapist should depend on the severity of their situation or status of one’s mental health. Teens should visit their therapist as many times as necessary in order to improve their mental health.

HOW LONG DOES THERAPY TAKE?

The length of therapy that someone needs will be different for each person. Therapy is an individual experience; some people may need a shorter time in therapy, while others may need help to process their emotions over a course of a few or more years. The length of therapy that one needs depends on the severity of someone’s situation and one’s motivation to improve their mental health. Emotions take time to process, so there is no rush when it comes to therapy.

HOW DO I ASK MY PARENTS IF I CAN START THERAPY?

To ask your parent/guardian about starting therapy, it's a good idea to slowly introduce the topic to them and have a good, long conversation about it. Let them know how you are feeling and why you need help in order for them to understand your situation more. If they seem to be in denial about it, remain persistent with your request to start therapy and let them know it will help you out mentally, and it will lea. If you are wondering what therapy centers are in your area, look at the next question for more info.

WHAT ARE SOME THERAPY CENTERS THAT I CAN VISIT NEARBY?

There are lots of therapy centers nearby, it’s all about finding the right center and therapist for you. You can visit Teen Therapy Center, which is near the Good Samaritan Hospital down Los-Gatos Boulevard. You can also visit the Campbell Teen and Therapy Center for help. Teen Therapy Center and Campbell Teen and Therapy Center are known for helping teenagers through their emotional troubles. Make sure to visit a therapy center that understands the struggles in which teens face throughout life, because they will understand your pains and struggles better than an adult-oriented therapist would.

WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT FROM MY FIRST SESSION?

During your first therapy session, your therapist’s goal is to learn about your backstory and for you to figure out if you are comfortable with them. Your therapist will ask your parents about what they hope you gather from the future sessions in therapy, and then they’ll ask you what you want. You will be asked about your family, friends, relationships, personality qualities, and everything in between. Your next few sessions will be similar to your first one, so don’t be discouraged if you feel that therapy is going too slow.

 

Are you having trouble knowing where to start when reaching out to a therapist? 
If so, try using this basic template, to help get you on your way.

Hi, 

My name is ________________________ (insert name here) and I am ___(age) years old. I am a _____________(state year) at Los Gatos High School.


Lately, I have been feeling _______________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________with school/my relationship/my friends/my family/my extracurriculars (choose any that apply).


I currently suffer from ___________________ (if any). I thought I would reach out to your therapy organization for help and to figure out any next options for me. I am looking for a group/individual therapist.


Please contact me to let me know if you have openings.

My phone number is _______________ and my email is _____________.


Thank you,

______________________(Your Name)

 

PERSONAL EXPERIENCES

Hi, I’m Giovanni Gollotti, and I have been going to therapy for the past three years. I started one-on-one therapy in freshman year because I had severe social anxiety and depression. At the start of freshman year, I was feeling suicidal, depressed, and anxious all the time, so I decided to start therapy at Teen Therapy Center after my physician referred me there. While I was in one-on-one therapy, I learned different techniques that I could use in order to minimize my anxiety. At the time, I was also exploring my sexuality since I’m bisexual, and therapy helped me to gain the confidence needed for me to come out to my parents. By the end of my first year, my depression has severely dropped to just borderline depression, and my anxiety decreased as well. Near the end of my first year in therapy, my therapist brought up the idea of group therapy. I joined a group of five girls who all went to different schools and were within my age range. We became a protective family to one another and were unafraid to share our emotions. Unfortunately, I never shared my problems with the girls because I wanted to focus on fixing their problems instead of my own. In group therapy, the teens in your group are the ones giving the main advice instead of your therapist. It’s more like a friend helping friend situation. Near the beginning of my new semester of sophomore year, I started questioning my gender identity. I figured out I was a boy, but it was strange for me to be in group therapy with a bunch of girls. Every time I mentioned my struggles with gender dysphoria or situations where my friends and family rejected me when I came out to them, none of my group members would truly understand what I was going through. I decided to return back to one-on-one therapy with a therapist who specializes in gender and sexuality. I’ve been with my new therapist for over a year now, and I no longer have depression or anxiety. I have also come to complete terms with my gender identity and am out to all of my main friends and family. Therapy has truly helped me thrive and learn to enjoy life.

 

Disclaimer

Cats to Cats is a peer-to-peer organization. The students on staff are not qualified to give advice or assist directly with any of the mental health issues presented. All informational and educational content is from widely-accepted sources and the testimonies of individuals featured and interviewed. More information on any of the sources or individuals can be found on this page or on our website. The information cited does not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the Cats to Cats Team or Los Gatos High School. 

Students can seek on-campus professional help from our contracted mental health provider CASSY, or view our Cats to Cats Therapy Information page for information on outside organizations. In addition, crisis hotlines are listed on our website.

In addition, if we receive any information involving potential or real harm to self or others, we are legally required to report the incident, which can lead to potential intervention by school or other authorities. The person who contacted us and/or the person's parents will be contacted to verify that the student's parents are aware of the situation and/or that the student is under the care of a professional.

In case of a criminal report, or when in doubt, please contact WeTip at 1-800-78-crime. WeTip receives anonymous and confidential reports and follows up with potential crimes. We encourage all students to be upstanders instead of bystanders when they witness or are the victims of wrongdoing.

 

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